Confessions of a Pilgrim Shopaholic Rhetorical Essay

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 135
  • Published : April 26, 2015
Open Document
Text Preview
Mihails Berezuns 
In the article, “Confessions of a Pilgrim Shopaholic” Puritan values such as the belief in  witchcraft, dressing in plain, conservative clothes, and the practice of saving and not spending  money, are satirized. To drive his attack on consumer society, and achieve the full effect of a  satirical piece, the author uses hyperbole, irony, far­fetched examples, and sarcasm.   The use of hyperbole dominates the article and is the prime strategy in the satirization.  For example, Rebecca a puritan lady is described traveling to Boston for a “thimbleful of salt”.  Then five years later, she has “travelled to Boston for  a second thimbleful” and afterwards  claims she is “out of control”. The importance of this thimbleful of salt is extremely over  exaggerated; the author makes it seem like the woman is committing a crime when she is just  getting salt that is very helpful in everyday life. Another example of hyperbole is the punishment  that the woman will receive if her husband finds out about her wantings: “I imagine myself  attending a fancy­dress ball with the pail on my arm, filled with pinecones and soil.  I fear the I  shall speak these dreams aloud, and beg my husband to bludgeon me”. Normally, one wouldn’t  get consequences for dreaming that they were attending a “fancy­dress ball” but since Puritan  values are over exaggerated and brought to the extreme, such repercussion does exist. Inversion,  which is a reversal of order, or form and irony is also at work when the woman is scorning her  child for having doll made out of rock: “‘I have made a doll from a small rock. I will call my doll  Rockelle.’ Of course, I struck her and grabbed the rock from her hand, saying, ‘Be ye the Queen  of the Nile, with such gilded pleasures?’ I will confess only to this diary that I have kept the rock  for myself, and married it to an acorn...Has my evil no limits?”. First, the author uses inversion ...
tracking img