Cyber Bullying

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  • Topic: Abuse, Cyber-bullying, Bullying
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  • Published : February 24, 2013
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Cyber Bullying
by Mr Bullyproof | Follow Him on Twitter Here
It was inevitable with the massive growth of internet and related technologies that cyber bullying would occur. Bullies will hurt their victims through whatever means they find to be effective. With cyber bullying, they can give powerful psychological blows to their victims and the resulting effects can last long after the bully has taken their action. http://www.mrbullyproof.com/cyber-bullying

MR BULLY PROOF
ANTI-BULLYING AND CONFIDENCE SPECIALIST

The Psychological Impact of Cyber Bullying
By:
Jerry Will and Clim Clayburn
University Business, Nov 2010
School violence, the threat of violence, and harassment continues to worry educators locally, nationally and internationally. Although violence exits in its rawest form, i.e., shootings, rape, kidnapping, and bomb threats; more passive and pervasive forms of harassment and/or bullying also exist. As we know bullying is as old as civilization itself. It has taken forms such as intimidation for lunch money, a slap on the head, a skirt pulled up or pants pulled down, and that seemingly never ending sororities and fraternities use of "beatdowns." We all remember that one person or persons who made someone's life miserable on a daily bases at school; where a student literally lived in fear. A new level of bullying has come over time with the easy accessibility of cell phones and computers. Cyber bullying, cell phone texting, and cell phone sexting have rapidly become more subtle and prevailing forms of harassment/violent acts within our schools and the lives of our private and public school children. Cyber bullying by federal and state statute definitions includes "bullying or harassment by use of any electronic communication device which can include but is not limited to email, instant messaging, text messages, blogs, mobile phones, pagers, online games, and websites" (Kansas Association of School Boards, Bullying Seminar, September 2008). Although the most violent school acts and threats continue to receive media attention, (i.e., U.S. v. Lori Drew; Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier; J.S. v. Bethlehem Area Sch. Dist.) cyber bullying and harassment via the cell phone continue to receive more and more media attention in the past two years. At the writing of this article there is an investigation into the suicide of a 15 year old in rural Massachusetts. Originally from Ireland and only in the U.S. for a few months, the freshman took her own life after being bullied in school and on Facebook. Cyber bullying can be worse than the school yard variety because a cyber bully can hide behind unsigned attacks on social network.  Just as acts of violence …jeopardizes the intent of the school to be free of aggression against persons or property…disruptions, and disorder (Center for the Prevention of School Violence, 2000, p. 2), cyber bullying and textual harassment are equally disruptive and threatening. In fact, cyber bullying can be worse than the traditional school yard variety because a cyber bully can remain anonymous by posting unsigned attacks on his/her online social network. Although Liza Belkin, 2010, was referring to parents of young children her comments are just as important in this text. She reports that "[the] anonymity of the Internet has a way of bringing out the harsh, judgmental streak in strangers who would never belittle another… in person." Victims of cyber bullying are literally humiliated in a worldwide venue which can occur 24 hours a day. When bullied in this fashion, whether text or image, it is virtually impossible to get everything removed from cyber space. "The bully [is] spreading information on the Internet for anyone to see and that can affect someone's social life, especially how other kids at school view them. It can also affect the person academically because their lack of confidence will prevent them from contributing and asking questions in class," Louis Cobb, 2007. It has...
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