Developing countries

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 870
  • Published : July 19, 2014
Open Document
Text Preview
Developing countries
Mortality strata
The mortality strata method classifies countries based on statistics for child and adult mortality. Data on child mortality is arranged into three groups: very low, low and high. Adult mortality is then used to break the low and high child mortality groups down further giving the strata. STRATA

CHILD MORTALITY
ADULT MORTALITY
COUNTRIES
A
Very low
Very low
Australia, Canada, USA
B
Low
Low
China, Mexico , Indonesia
C
Low
High
Russia, Ukraine, Yemen
D
High
High
Morocco, Peru, Afghanistan
E
High
Very high
Ethiopia, Kenya, Zimbabwe

Broad grouping method
The broad grouping method classifies countries into three groups: developed, low-mortality developing and high-mortality developing based on mortality patterns, geography and the state of economic and demographic development.

Characteristics
Economic characteristics:
Developing countries often have a large proportion of their population living in poverty compared to developed counties Developed countries often have a wide range of industries including mining, manufacturing, education, health, scientific research and technology whereas developing countries often have a limited range of industries, usually centred on farming and primary production. This reduces the ability of developing countries to trade on the global market, as they may not be able to generate goods that other countries require Developing countries often lack the infrastructure, knowledge and range of goods and services to trade on a global scale. This prevents the economics of developing countries from growing and contributes to the low average incomes they experience Social characteristics:

Developed countries often experience gender equality where both males and females have opportunities and choices with regards to education, employment, community participation and recreation. In many developing countries, females do not have the same opportunities as males in society. Access to contraception, choice with regards to family planning, career choices and education contribute to low birth rates of many developed countries compared to developing countries Most developed countries experience strong political and legal systems. Unstable government and political unrest are characteristic of many developing countries and increase the risk of civil conflict. Developed countries have health systems. People are usually able to access basic health care when they need it. Those in developing countries often lack access to suitable health care, which affects the level of wellbeing they experience

Environmental characteristics
People in developed countries generally have access to a quality food supply however those in developing countries often lack food security Compared to developed countries, many people in developing countries lack access to adequate housing. They often live in housing with poor ventilation, lack of heating and cooling, poor resistance to infestation of disease carrying organisms such as insects, lack of cooking facilities and running water, and poor protection from the elements Developed countries usually have adequate roads, piped water, sewerage systems, electricity grids and telecommunication systems. People living in developing countries often lack access to such facilities

Global marketing
Global marketing means marketing and promoting a product throughout the world Three of the largest globally marketed products have some of the greatest impacts on health: tobacco, alcohol and processed foods Tobacco

The desire to be more westernised and targeted marketing has led to increases in rate and number of smokers in developing countries. Increased rates of smoking in developing countries is contributing to an increased burden of disease, particularly in relation to an increase in lifestyle related diseases, especially cancers, cardiovascular disease and respiratory conditions...
tracking img