Heather s speech on bullying in schools

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Bullying in Schools
Heather Ann McKee
AC 1403957
SP180 1.2. Principles of Public Speaking
November 25, 2014

Heather Ann McKee
AC1403957
SP180 1.2. Principles of Public Speaking
November 25, 2014

Suppose you’re walking down the hall at school just minding your own business, attempting to get to class on time and suddenly out of nowhere you are purposely tripped by a hooligan. All of your fellow classmates and students at the school begin to laugh. As you lie on the floor embarrassed, humiliated, and traumatized. How do you react? Do you laugh along playing dumb or do you play “narc” and tell a teacher? There is no correct answer to this precarious situation. Either way, you have now been labeled. School bullying has officially occurred. School bullying has become a major concern specifically defined as an unwelcome behavior among school aged children that is usually perceived as a power imbalance (Ebscohost Connection, 2014). Bullying is comprised of direct behaviors such a teasing, taunting, threatening, hitting, and stealing that are initiated by one or more students against a victim. In order to be considered bullying, the behavior theoretically is repeated and aggressive in nature be it as a verbal, physical or emotional abuse. Every child has the right to an education, and every child has the right to be safe. As adults, one would believe that bullying is a high priority. However, it is fairly overlooked at times. It is the schools' professional obligation to provide a safe school environment for all students. In order for schools to be a healthy and safe environment they must be free from violence and provide a nurturing, caring and respectful of learning arena for everyone. Most bullies do not feel remorse for what they have done; it tends to feed to their egos.

Bullying within the school system has become a worldwide problem that can have negative consequences for the school climate and for the right of students to learn in a safe and bully-free environment without intimidation (Banks, Ron. 2013, July 15). Many schools throughout the educational system have developed and implemented peer support groups and bully task force groups to assist in the intervention to bring bullying to an end. Thus, those victims can be at ease to put their guard down and receive a quality education and negate that euphoric feeling of superiority within that same group, lacking within their personal psyche. Bullying is usually a one-on-one behavior. However, many times it is normally driven by an alpha personality in the group of people singling out one particular person of a weaker social status or physical physique. Such actions can result in the alienation of that student from fellow classmates that can cause various forms of trauma within any given peer group. Thus, potentially causing social exclusion. Physical bullying occurs when a person uses overt bodily acts to gain power over peers (Fraser-Thill, 2014, May 2). Examples include: biting, kicking, pushing, pinching, hitting, tripping, hair pulling, and any form of physical contact that causes violence or harm. Verbal bullying is when an individual uses degradable language to gain power over his or her peers (Brimm, 2012 - 2014). Examples of verbal bullying include: sarcasm, teasing, put-downs, name calling, inappropriate phone calls, and hurtful rumors and gossip. These effects have caused students to commit suicide or commit crimes such as attempted murder or even murder. A 12-year olds’ family says that bullying at school was a direct result to their child's suicide. In Denver, CO a young girl unfortunately took her own precious life due to the other girls abusing her with no more than gossip. According to her classmate Montebello, “she was the most beautiful person you could ever imagine (Joseph, 2014, April 29).” A recent example occurred in the Pittsburgh area when Franklin Regional High School had a...
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