Hellokitty

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ESSAY REPORT
Question Attempted:

“The role of engineers will be critical in fulfilling these demands at various scales, ranging from small remote communities to large urban areas (megacities), mostly in the developing world. In what ways can engineers contribute to overcoming human development problems? Illustrate your argument by outlining at least three (3) specific skills required of engineers to undertake this kind of work in improving people’s lives.” -------------------------------------------------

Table of Contents
1INTRODUCTION3
2SKILLS REQUIRED BY ENGINEERS IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD3
2.1COLLABORATION WITH THE COMMUNITY3
2.2WHOLESOME KNOWLEDGE4
2.3DIVERSITY IN APPROACH4
3CONCLUSION5
REFLECTION6
BIBLIOGRAPHY7

INTRODUCTION

The challenges faced by the modern world are truly immense. According to United Nation Development Programme’s Human Development Report (2006), almost two in three people lacking access to clean water survive on less than $2 a day, with one in three living on less than $1 a day and about 1.6 billion people without electricity. These human development issues exist all across the globe more acutely in developing nations. The need of the hour is to engineer a long lasting and sustainable solution to these problems. This sort of human development engineering is different from “conventional” engineering where blue prints are made with all statistical data easily available.

SKILLS REQUIRED BY ENGINEERS IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD

Fostering human development through engineering brings with it its own set of challenges. Engineers not only need to be technically sound but also need to have more than a “working” knowledge of economics, society, geography, culture to name a few. Interpersonal skills, dealing with government institutions, partnering with the local community is key with these projects which mostly take place in rural or semi-urban areas of developing nations. On the practical side of things, engineers working in such areas that are not well connected to well equipped cities should be extra cautious at every stage of the project from design to implementation. Moreover, due to the lack of verified information readily available for some of these areas as well as their inaccessibility, engineers should be diverse in their solutions. Flexible alternatives must be thought of and incorporated from the start. These points are further explored below.

COLLABORATION WITH THE COMMUNITY
An engineer should be well versed with the existing problems, needs, and skills available – technical or non-technical, within a community. Being respectful of the culture, people and environment of a community is the only way to devise a robust solution. Multi-cultural collaboration is a fundamental skill that engineers should imbibe. This is extremely necessary, as the success of a project is defined by how well the community adopts, utilises and maintains it. Consequently, more often it can be seen that skill training and empowerment is part of the project plan and its implementation. “Find out what people do best and teach them to do it better” (E.F. Schumacher, 2003) summarizes this. An engineer should be prepared for this if the need be. He also has to ensure that the materials being used in the project aren’t too complicated to be used with and can be readily sourced.

WHOLESOME KNOWLEDGE
According to Maddocks, Dickens & Crawford (2002) attributes, skills and qualities of an engineer can be classified into the five following categories: * Knowledge and Understanding
* Intellectual Abilities
* Practical Skills
* General Transferable Skills
* Qualities.

‘Knowledge and understanding’ includes skills such as specialisation, management techniques, ethical responsibilities, social outcomes and awareness. Maddocks et al. goes on to describe intellectual abilities as being able to solve...
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