School Violence

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Tyeshia Michie
Professor Silverstein
English 102
School Violence
School violence is the term used to define violence or any form of arrogance that happens inside a school. Some of the known forms of school violence are student gangs, bullying, physical attacks on fellow students, and physical attacks on the school staffs. This is becoming a very serious issue in the United States where the school violence rates are extremely high with students possessing knives, guns and other weapons at will. In the earlier days, schools were the safest places for students. Students were safer than they were at their homes because they were being monitored each and every second by the school staffs and other fellow students, but it is no longer the same because of the alarming increase of school violence inside the school premises. The school authorities are not able to control such inclement activities inside the school and parents all over the world are concerned with this very serious issue because their children are prone to be victims of school violence.

Leading Causes of School Violence
Pinpointing causes of school violence is a difficult task. It is difficult to categorize the numerous school violence attacks that have occurred. Each case has different circumstances. The majority of researchers agree that school violence is the result of a society unable to always distinguish between good or bad choices and right or wrong moral decisions but have suggested various theories on what may lead a student to incite violence. Children who witness domestic violence in the home and who are not taught otherwise are likely to internalize such behavior as appropriate means of dealing with conflicts in the school. Such students who get in confrontations with other students may be predisposed to engage in physical violence. Students who grow up in communities with street violence also may react violently to perceived threats. According to "Youth Violence: A Report by the Surgeon General," psychological conditions hyperactivity, impulsiveness, daring and short attention span can pose a small risk for violence. Dr. Christopher J. Ferguson of Texas A&M International University notes in The Journal of Pediatrics that depression is a leading cause of youth violence. Additionally, Thomas Grisso professor of psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School writes in "The Future of Children" that kids with mental disorders are at an increased risk of displaying aggressive behavior. Having access to guns and other weapons may enable students to commit violent acts against their peers. The report "Violence Prevention: The Evidence" by the World Health Organization states limiting access to weapons can lead to a reduction in violent acts. Students may find guns in their homes or acquire guns illegally on the street. Without access to weapons, however, students would be unable to carry out violent acts. Students who have been bullied may retaliate against their peers. The National School Safety Council notes that many who participate in such acts are bullied or ostracized from their peers. Peers reportedly bullied or ignored the Columbine shooters, which caused their anger. However, the surgeon general notes that violence in the media also may lead kids to engage in aggressive and violent behavior.

What Are the Causes of Bullying in Schools?
Bullying is a serious problem in schools and, according to Kids Health, three quarters of kids says that they have been bullied or teased at school as of 2010. Bullying takes a variety of forms and has several detrimental effects on children including depression, stress, sickness, physical injuries and even death. The first step in dealing with bullying is to pinpoint the causes behind bullying and clarify some of its many bullies engage in bullying as a way to draw attention to themselves and make themselves feel important. Unfortunately, according to Education.com, bullies tend to be...
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