Sudden Death

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 278
  • Published : August 11, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
ROYAL COLLEGE OF N URSI NG

Witnessing resuscitation
Guidance for nursing staff

Witnessing resuscitation
Guidance for nursing staff

This publication provides a literature review on witnessing resuscitation and offers guidance to help nursing staff understand the issues and implications for nursing practice.

Acknowledgements
RCN Accident & Emergency Nurses Association Steering Committee and members Members from RCN Forums and Advisory Panels

Comments and support from:
Resuscitation Council (UK) British Association of Accident and Emergency Medicine British Medical Association Medical Ethics Committee Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health Patients Association

ROYAL COLLEGE OF N URSI NG

Witnessing resuscitation
Guidance for nursing staff

Contents
1 Introduction Background to RCN guidance Context Perceptions and effects of witnessing resuscitation – what the literature says Preparation for witnessing resuscitation Support for relatives Establishing ground rules When relatives should not be allowed into the resuscitation room When relatives should be allowed into the resuscitation room Supporting relatives in the resuscitation area Stopping resuscitation Following resuscitation Medico-legal issues Confidentiality Consent Capacity and incapacity Best interests and who decides Avoiding harm to those who witness resuscitation (nervous shock) Avoiding harm to nursing staff involved with the family Implications for nursing practice Comments from RCN members Conclusion 2 3 4 4 5 5 5 6 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 9 9 10 11 12 12 13 15

2 3

4 5 6

7 8 9

Appendices Appendix 1 – Witnessing resuscitation – a check list for practice Appendix 2 – The Resuscitation Council’s (UK) Guidelines Appendix 3 – Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals: model witnessed resuscitation policy References

1

W ITN E S S I NG R E S U SCITAT ION

1
Introduction
There are an estimated 25,000 to 30,000 resuscitation attempts in the UK every year1. The specialist areas that are most likely to be involved are accident and emergency (A&E) departments and critical care. Dealing with the suddenly bereaved can be difficult for all nursing staff, regardless of their experience2. This booklet provides a literature review on witnessing resuscitation and offers guidance to help nursing staff understand the issues and implications for nursing practice. Medical Association, the Royal College of Nursing and the Resuscitation Council5. The changing culture of involving patients in the decision-making process of treatment opens up the possibility of discussing resuscitation and if close relatives should be present. A letter from a critical care nurse to the Chair of RCN Council commented that “Resuscitation is not just an event that takes place in A&E departments, it takes place across a wide range of care environments and this must be taken into account. The charged environment of an accident and emergency resuscitation room is very different to the controlled environment of the intensive care area for example”.Resuscitation is also a term used to depict a wide variety of events in the acute care setting, and could be fluid replacement, trauma, respiratory, or cardiac. For the purposes of this guidance the term resuscitation is used to refer to cardiopulmonary resuscitation which can be attempted when cardiac or respiratory functions cease. The Resuscitation Council (UK) published a report in 19966 which recommends that relatives should be allowed to witness resuscitation attempts and that they should be supported by appropriately trained health care professionals. The report states that in many cases relatives prefer to be present if given the choice, partly because they can see that everything possible is being done for the dying person and because they feel their presence might have some positive benefit on the outcome.

Background to RCN guidance
A resolution debated and carried at the RCN Congress 2000 called for Council to work with...
tracking img